Chasing the sun on the day of solar eclipse

Chasing the sun on the day of solar eclipse

Solar eclipse is the day people just want to look at the sky so as to see the moon cover the sun. On August 21, 2017, the eclipse will occur and last for about just two and half minutes, which is why people do not want to miss it. This time around, the scientists from NASA have decided to capture the moments of the eclipse very closely. How is it possible?

NASA has got the perfect solution to it, that is, it has its two WB-57F jet planes for following the shadow of the Moon on the day of solar eclipse. Secret revealed. A researcher Amir Caspi from the Southwest Research Institute and his team have decided on using two of the NASA’s research jets to chase the darkness that will spread on America on August 21 of this year. What’s fascinating is that the jets will have twin telescopes built up on the nose of the jet so as to capture the clearest of the Sun’s outer atmospheric images. The telescope will help arrest the temperature changes seen in the thermal images of the Mercury while nearing the corona. The images will help conclude the temperature variation across the planet’s surface.

The first-ever data and images of the high frequency changes in the corona can be observed and captured is what the researchers are looking forward to. The goal of reaching high altitudes and observing for a longer time will help track the waves that are invisible to the naked eye from the ground. The opportunity of studying the unique astronomical phenomena of the Sun and its effect on the Earth’s atmosphere is amazing. The studying of the Sun when the Moon completely covers it with just a faint corona of light seen in the dark sky is an event that NASA wants to capture.

Chasing the sun on the day of solar eclipse

As per the previous studies, the Sun is heated to millions of degrees in the corona and just a few thousand degrees at the outer surface named photosphere. The Alfvén waves are supposedly responsible in distributing the heat across the Sun, wherein it is dissipated as heat. There are nanoflares, that is, micro-explosions taking place on the Sun frequently in order to release the heat into the corona on a collective basis. These phenomena can be captured by the high-resolution and high frequency images taken from the WB-57F jets that will help reveal the changes on the corona.

The jets will help capture the high-speed and high-resolution images through the onboard telescope and untangle the mystery of magnetic field mess on the surface of the Sun. The Mercurial day will help study the temperature changes from below 0° to 800F. In short, WB-57F will help scrutinize the Sun on the day of the solar eclipse.

You May Also Like